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Affordable Skoda Kodiaq Diesel Estate Diesel leasing, All our Skoda Kodiaq Diesel Estate leasing offers include free mainland delivery and exceptional customer support.

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Skoda Kodiaq - 2.0 TDI 200 SE L Executive 4x4 5dr DSG [7 Seat]

Images for illustration purposes only and may show options not included in the rental

Affordable Skoda Kodiaq Diesel Estate Diesel leasing, All our Skoda Kodiaq Diesel Estate leasing offers include free mainland delivery and exceptional customer support.

  • Diesel
Skoda Kodiaq - 2.0 TDI 200 SE L Executive 4x4 5dr DSG [7 Seat]

Images for illustration purposes only and may show options not included in the rental

All Prices Subject to change and any offer may be removed from sale without prior notice.
All images used are for illustration purposes only and may not reflect the exact car supplied or model shown.

Specifications: Central (UK) Vehicle Leasing Limited are NOT liable for any manufacturer changes in models or specifications. It is the customers responsibility to ensure that the
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£263.99 inc VAT

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Independent Review - By Car and Driving

By Jonathan Crouch

Introduction

Skoda established itself in the mid-sized SUV segment with the first generation version of its Kodiaq, a model that was usefully upgraded in 2021 with a smarter look, both inside and out, and some more efficient engines. Buyers could still have seven seats and four wheel drive. And, whatever spec was chosen, still got class-leading passenger space and a range of distinctly Skoda 'Simply Clever' features. This Skoda can tow up to 2.5-tonnes too - and has one of the largest boots in the class from its period. In other words, you'd have to take this contender seriously as a used buy.

Models

5dr SUV (1.4 TSI, 1.5 TSI, 2.0 TSI, 2.0 TDI)

History

The Skoda Kodiaq. It seems astonishing to think that prior to the original launch of this car in 2016, the Czech brand had never bought the European market a family-sized SUV. The Kodiaq was that car and proved to be a genuine game changer for the brand. In 2021, it was fully updated, creating the model we're going to look at here. By 2021, it was one of five SUVs the brand offered but remained hugely significant for Skoda, with over 600,000 sales registered prior to the launch of this facelifted model and production plants in China, India and Russia as well as Skoda's domestic factory in Kvasiny. That allowed this car to sell in around 60 markets across the globe. Most Kodiaq's were sold in 7-seat form, in which guise this car faced directly up to almost identically engineered models from two other VW Group brands, the SEAT Tarraco and the Volkswagen Tiguan Allspace. Potential customers might also be looking at cars from this period like the Peugeot 5008 and the Nissan X-Trail. Plenty of competition then, hence the need for this mid-term update, which brought us a slightly sharper look, a smarter customer interior, improved safety and connectivity and more efficient engines - everything, in other words, that you'd expect from a facelift. The Kodiaq sold in this form until early 2024, when it was replaced by a second generation model.

What You Get

Skoda's sharp, clean-cut design language translated very well into the kind of purposeful premium look required of a modern full-sized SUV. The Kodiaq's just 8mm longer than the Czech brand's Octavia family hatch, yet looks far larger, with striking styling supposed to convey an impression of protection and strength. For this revised version, design chief Oliver Stefani sought to add a crisper front-end look and more dynamic tail treatment. But the changes were pretty subtle. Most of them featured at the front, where there was a more elevated bonnet and a redesigned, more upright Skoda grille. The headlights flanking it, still inspired by traditional Czech crystal glass art, were slimmer in this revised model and got full-LED beams, with the option of intelligent Matrix technology. Not much changed in profile with this updated MK1 design, apart from the more aerodynamic wheel designs; rims range in size from 18-inches to the 20-inch 'Sagitarius' alloys fitted at the top of the range. The rugged-looking plastic-clad wheel arches really need larger rim sizes to complete the intended SUV look, which is emphasised by roof rails and strong lower sills. It's all very practical, rather than trying to be sporty, which is why the Chinese market got an additional separate Kodiaq GT SUV Coupe model. At the rear, the roof spoiler was redesigned, complete with its third brake light. Plus the rear window below was narrower and there were slimmer, more sharply designed LED tail lights with crystalline structures that form the Skoda-typical C-shaped light cluster. This vRS model set itself apart with distinct badging and reflector spanning the entire width of the vehicle. Behind the wheel, the Skoda design team usefully updated the solid and quite classy Kodiaq cabin. The top vRS model featured microsuede-trimmed sports seats and red stitching, but even humbler models took a big step forward in cabin ambiance. Primarily due to additions like classier decorative strips, additional contrasting stitching, a smarter capacity steering wheel and enhanced LED ambient lighting. Plusher models could be ordered with perforated ergonomically supportive leather seats and the enhanced 10-speaker CANTON sound system. The cabin screen tech also pushes things up-market. True, entry-level trim still came with old fashioned analogue dials and an 8-inch 'Amundsen' centre display no bigger than the screen size of the original model. But above base-spec level, this Kodiaq's cabin felt considerably more up to date with a 10.25-inch 'Virtual cockpit' digital display for the instrument binnacle and a larger 9.2-inch 'Columbus' infotainment monitor for the centre of the dash, which also included 'Laura', Skoda's 'digital assistant' voice control system. Getting comfortable is straightforward, with lots of seat and wheel adjustment making it easy to find the ideal position. Plus there's loads of cabin storage space. And in the rear? Well the second row bench features all the versatility you'd want from this kind of seven-seat SUV, so the backrest reclines for greater comfort on long journeys and the base slides back and forth by up to 180mm. So, what's it like in the third row? Well there, you're quickly reminded that this is an SUV, not an MPV. Overall though, the space in the very back isn't really any more restricted than it would be in any other mid-sized SUV of this kind - and uncomplaining adults joining you for short journeys will probably be quite glad of it. What about cargo capacity? With the tailgate raised, a huge aperture is revealed, complete with a usefully low loading sill. Most of the time, owners of seven-seat Kodiaq models are probably going to be using their cars with the rearmost seats folded into the floor, an action easy and simple to complete. In which case there's 630-litres of space on offer with the middle row sensibly positioned. Fold the second row bench and a class leadingly-large 2,005-litre space is revealed (or 2,065-litres in a five seat-only model).

What You Pay

Please contact us for an exact up-to-date valuation.

What to Look For

Our ownership survey came up with a few things. In some cases, the door handles creak when you grab them. We've also heard of issues with the front assist sensors and the trunk cover which occasionally is stopped from rolling back. Other owners have reported premature wear of wheels, rattling sounds and parts of the upholstery coming apart. Check out all the electrics. In one case the key fob opening only the tailgate halfway. There have also been issues with door guards jamming out and getting knocked off. There have also been some reported issues with the Mirrorlink aspect of the infotainment system, so make sure that the screen pairs properly to your smart phone. Otherwise, it's just the usual things: signs of interior child damage and the interior scratches and the alloy wheels caused through poor parking. Insist on full service history. There's a product recall we should tell you about. For models made between 2020 and 2022, there was a recall regarding engine design covers that might come loose from their attachment. Make sure that the Kodiaq you're looking at has had this recall issue addressed.

Replacement Parts

(approx based on a 2021 Kodiaq 2.0 TSI vRS excl. VAT) A pair of front brake pads are around £55; rears are around £20-£67. A pair of front brake discs start at about £57-£88; rears are around £26-£80. A water pump is around £45. Air filters sit in the £10-£31 bracket. Oil filters cost around £9-£17. A wiper blade is around £10-£17. A water pump is around £103. A rear lamp is around £176-£229. A pollen filter is around £8-£27.

On the Road

Skoda refreshed the engine portfolio for this updated Kodiaq model, but there were no significant dynamic changes, so it'll all be quite recognisable if you're familiar with earlier versions of this car. If you're approaching a drive hoping for a rewarding time at the wheel, you're obviously a very optimistic sort of person. Even in the modern era, big spacious seven-seat SUVs have a reputation for handling with all the dynamic finesse of a Channel ferry. As do big Skodas. It's pleasantly surprising then, to find that the Kodiaq is actually quite an agile thing by class standards, its relatively light weight and rigid chassis delivering decent body control through the turns, though you'd better appreciate that if the steering felt more responsive. Another noticeable trait lies in the way that the four-link rear suspension set-up provides a firm-ish quality of ride that's a world away from the soft floaty springing you'd get in the Czech brand's similarly priced Superb Estate. You can improve it by finding a car fitted with the optional 'DCC' 'Dynamic Chassis Control' adaptive damping package. This works through the settings of the 'Drive Mode Select' system provided on most models, a package able to alter steering feel and throttle response - plus gearshift timings if you've variant fitted with the 7-speed DSG auto gearbox that nearly all Kodiaqs had to have. As for engines, well Skoda structured the line-up so that almost all buyers ended up going for a 150PS unit - either a 1.5-litre TSI petrol powerplant. Or, more likely, a 2.0-litre TDI diesel. the latter black pump-fuelled unit being from the VW Group's EVO generation featuring the conglomerate's clean 'Twin Dosing' technology that lowered NOx emissions by up to 80%. As a result, the 2.0 TDI 150PS variant most will want manages up to 141g/km of CO2 in front-driven form and up to 52.3mpg on the combined cycle. If you're looking at these two mainstream engines, bear in mind that only the 1.5-litre petrol unit can be had with manual transmission, but unlike the 2.0 TDI 150PS diesel, it couldn't be ordered from new with the option of 4WD. That 4WD set-up, by the way, is the usual Volkswagen Group on-demand system that cuts in when lack of traction demands it. It's a system that comes with a selectable 'Off Road' mode that focuses all the car's electronic systems for 'off piste' use. If neither of the two mainstream engines suit, then you might want to look at some other more powerful options, which as you might expect, only come in combination with auto transmission and 4WD. There's a top 200PS version of the diesel unit. Or, alternatively, there's a 190PS version of the brand's 2.0 TSI petrol powerplant. Beyond that lies the top sporting vRS variant, which as part of this facelift swapped the bi turbo 240PS diesel engine it previously had for a 245PS version of that 2.0-litre TSI petrol powertrain.

Overall

Today, around half of all the cars Skoda sells are SUVs, a modern-era reinvention of the brand started with this Kodiaq. This revised version of the original model didn't need too many changes - and it didn't get them. If you didn't already want a first generation Kodiaq, then this update won't change your mind. But if this Czech family crossover takes your interest, then with this enhanced post-2021-era design, there are now even more reasons to feel satisfied with your choice. And in summary? Well yes, the Kodiaq isn't particularly engaging to drive - but what car in this sector is? And anyway, its other attributes are far more important for customers in this segment: comfort, refinement, decent all-round value and spacious 7-seat practicality. All of which means one thing: if you've a growing family, a sensible budget and a desire for the style of an SUV, the Kodiaq's still a car you can't ignore.

This vehicle has been discontinued.

Advantages

Advantages
Variable Initial rentals (Zero possible)
Road Tax included for full duration
Breakdown Cover
Full Manufacturer warranty
Peace of mind motoring
No payment fluctuations
Delivered to your front door (free)
Taxable Benefits for Businesses
Possible VAT reclaims
No Depreciation to worry about
No Baloon payment

Considerations

Considerations
Do not own vehicle
Cannot modify vehicle
Possible end of contract costs
Possible Excess mileage Charge
Credit Check performed
Possible Early Termination fee
No Equity