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Affordable Porsche Taycan Sport Turismo Electric leasing, All our Porsche Taycan Sport Turismo leasing offers include free mainland delivery and exceptional customer support.

  • Electric
Porsche Taycan - 440kW GTS 93kWh 5dr Auto
Porsche Taycan - 440kW GTS 93kWh 5dr Auto
Porsche Taycan - 440kW GTS 93kWh 5dr Auto
Porsche Taycan - 440kW GTS 93kWh 5dr Auto
Porsche Taycan - 440kW GTS 93kWh 5dr Auto
Porsche Taycan - 440kW GTS 93kWh 5dr Auto
Porsche Taycan - 440kW GTS 93kWh 5dr Auto
Porsche Taycan - 440kW GTS 93kWh 5dr Auto
Porsche Taycan - 440kW GTS 93kWh 5dr Auto
Porsche Taycan - 440kW GTS 93kWh 5dr Auto
Porsche Taycan - 440kW GTS 93kWh 5dr Auto

Images for illustration purposes only and may show options not included in the rental

Affordable Porsche Taycan Sport Turismo Electric leasing, All our Porsche Taycan Sport Turismo leasing offers include free mainland delivery and exceptional customer support.

  • Electric
Porsche Taycan - 440kW GTS 93kWh 5dr Auto
Porsche Taycan - 440kW GTS 93kWh 5dr Auto
Porsche Taycan - 440kW GTS 93kWh 5dr Auto
Porsche Taycan - 440kW GTS 93kWh 5dr Auto
Porsche Taycan - 440kW GTS 93kWh 5dr Auto
Porsche Taycan - 440kW GTS 93kWh 5dr Auto
Porsche Taycan - 440kW GTS 93kWh 5dr Auto
Porsche Taycan - 440kW GTS 93kWh 5dr Auto
Porsche Taycan - 440kW GTS 93kWh 5dr Auto
Porsche Taycan - 440kW GTS 93kWh 5dr Auto
Porsche Taycan - 440kW GTS 93kWh 5dr Auto

Images for illustration purposes only and may show options not included in the rental

Porsche Taycan - 440kW GTS 93kWh 5dr Auto
Porsche Taycan - 440kW GTS 93kWh 5dr Auto
Porsche Taycan - 440kW GTS 93kWh 5dr Auto
Porsche Taycan - 440kW GTS 93kWh 5dr Auto
Porsche Taycan - 440kW GTS 93kWh 5dr Auto
Porsche Taycan - 440kW GTS 93kWh 5dr Auto
Porsche Taycan - 440kW GTS 93kWh 5dr Auto
Porsche Taycan - 440kW GTS 93kWh 5dr Auto
Porsche Taycan - 440kW GTS 93kWh 5dr Auto
Porsche Taycan - 440kW GTS 93kWh 5dr Auto
Porsche Taycan - 440kW GTS 93kWh 5dr Auto

All Prices Subject to change and any offer may be removed from sale without prior notice.
All images used are for illustration purposes only and may not reflect the exact car supplied or model shown.

Specifications: Central (UK) Vehicle Leasing Limited are NOT liable for any manufacturer changes in models or specifications. It is the customers responsibility to ensure that the
vehicle(s) has the correct specification required. Any information supplied on specification is only for
guidance purposes and obtained from a third party CAP Data and not the manufacturer. For accurate specification data please consult the manufacturer direct.

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Independent Review - By Car and Driving

Porsche's Taycan Sport Turismo adds finesse to the market's wildest electric SUV. Jonathan Crouch takes a look at the improved version.

Ten Second Review

If you'd like your Porsche Taycan luxury EV with extra presence and practicality but don't want or need the look of an SUV, Zuffenhausen wants you to consider this, the Taycan Sport Turismo. Your ultimate luxury sports EV? Very possibly. Here's a look at the revised version.

Background

This might be the perfect interpretation of Porsche's Taycan concept. This luxury EV first appeared in Sports Saloon four-door form. Then we got the Cross Turismo SUV version. What if you could get the best of both, the suspension of the Sports Saloon with the practicality of the Cross Turismo body shape? That's the idea behind the Taycan Sport Turismo. Now it's been significantly improved - faster, longer-ranging and quicker-charging. As before, there's a wider choice of battery and drivetrain options with this third interpretation of the Taycan theme - compared to the 'Cross' version anyway. You can have a rear-driven variant - and one with Porsche's smaller 89kWh battery, neither option possible with the Cross Turismo. That means a significantly lower entry price them with the 'Cross' too. Sounds interesting.

Driving Experience

As before, all Sport Turismo derivatives are almost indecently fast, but quite a lot's new with this revised version, though for the time being, Porsche has decided not to adopt the tri-motor drive system from cousin model Audi's SQ8 e-tron. Instead, Zuffenhausen has redesigned this Taycan's rear electric motor, which is 10.4kg lighter than before, but up to 108PS more powerful, depending on the variant you're looking at. When fitted with the Sport Chrono Pack that most customers want, the base single-motor rear-driven Taycan Sport Turismo offers 435PS (26PS more than before). And the mid-range dual-motor Taycan 4S now offers 598PS (up 68PS from before). The biggest increases though, are at the top of the range, where the strangely-named 'Turbo' version offers 883PS (203PS more) and the Turbo S develops an impressive 951PS (188PS more). A push-to-pass feature on the now-standard mode switch gives a quick burst of acceleration should you need it. More dynamic variants are to follow, including a GTS derivative, a Turbo S Performance Pack model and a top GT. As for EV range, well depending on variant, that can be up to 421 miles, an increase of up to 109 miles. Helping here is an increase in battery size, the base pack now at 89kWh, with the larger pack (standard on the Turbo variants) now at 105kWh. What else? Well air suspension is now mandatory (the old coil-spring set-up's no longer offered) and the twin-chamber air springs are matched to the new dual-valve dampers recently introduced in the Panamera. This more greatly varies the car's behaviour between its 'Comfort' and 'Sport' modes and allows for variable ride heights at high speeds. As before, the most difficult task the engineers had here was in disguising what as usual on an EV is a prodigious kerb weight - in this case around 2.3-tonnes. Plenty's been thrown at that problem as part of this update. Optional is an Active air suspension system which enables individual control of each damper via a small electrically-driven compressor. Roll and pitch through the bends can then be countered, without the need for the physical anti-roll bars used in the previously-available PDCC anti-roll system. Turbo and Turbo S models get Porsche's Torque Vectoring Plus rear differential, which through turns is able to over-speed the outer rear wheel to help the Taycan's cornering balance. Rear-wheel steering is optional across the line-up (and standard on the Turbo S). And all of this tech is co-ordinated by a clever Porsche 4D Chassis Control set-up. The result through the turns is quite simply astonishing when you consider the amount of weight in play here. And the steering, brakes and ride quality are all brilliant - almost 911-like. No other large EV drives like this. The soul of a sports car? That about covers it.

Design and Build

Just to be clear: this Sport Turismo model has the same bodyshell as the Cross Turismo, but without side cladding or raised suspension. As with the 'Cross', it has a nose section differentiated from that of the ordinary four-door Taycan by a specific front apron. The unusual profile's defined by a sporty fly line that slopes towards the rear, ending in high-gloss black fixed roof spoiler. And as on the saloon, there are flat door handles that are flush with the doors and pop out electrically when required. As for the visual update changes, well they're subtle. Porsche has redesigned the bumpers across the range, with a bespoke look for the Turbo variants (which also get new 'Turbonite' exterior detailing). And the aero-optimised wheels have been redesigned, with sizes between 19 and 21-inches. New Matrix LED headlights now feature, with HD matrix units available as an option. There are far fewer changes inside, apart from a few colour and trim options and updates to the interfaces for the curved 16.8-inch driver's display, the main 10.9-inch centre touchscreen and the optional front passenger monitor. Otherwise, things are much as before, which means a dashboard apparently influenced by the original 911 design from 1963 in the respect that there are very few buttons and the instrument cluster is wider than the steering wheel. In the rear, a roof line modified over the Sports Saloon enables rear seat passengers to enjoy 47mm more headroom. Clever so-called 'foot garages' scooped out of the EV floorplan mean that there's plenty of space for your feet. You don't get the middle part of the rear bench as standard; that's only supplied as part of an extra-cost '4+1' package. As you'd expect from this Sport Turismo model's more practical body style, the boot is bigger than that of the Taycan Sports Saloon, increased from the 407-litre total you get with that EV sedan to 446-litres here. As on other Taycans, there's also an additional 84-litre front 'frunk' compartment.

Market and Model

If you're comparing against the Cross Turismo, you need to know that only the Sport Turismo offers an entry-level rear-driven single motor 435PS model, priced from around £87,000 at the time of this review. But that and the next model up in the Sport Turismo range, the AWD Taycan 4S Sport Turismo (which costs around £97,000 and puts out 598PS), both come as standard only with Porsche's smaller 89kWh battery pack. With either of these two base 'Sport Turismo' variants, you have to pay around £4,500 more for the larger 105kWh 'Performance Battery Plus' package, which we think would be an important additional spend to make. As you'd expect, the top Turbo Sport Turismo models do get the bigger 105kWh battery as standard, but they of course also get much higher price tags. You're looking at around £135,000 for the 883PS Turbo or around £162,000 for the 951PS flagship Turbo S. Inevitably, it's possible to spend a further fortune on the options list - which you'll need to do if you want all of the handling systems available. There's also a whole portfolio of available camera and radar-driven safety and autonomous driving tech. Most Taycan owners will want Adaptive Cruise Control, which works particularly well as part of the Porsche InnoDrive system. This can look ahead for up to two miles as you drive using radar and sensor feedback plus predictive GPS data before then modifying speed and gearshift strategy to better suit the speed limits, topographic road features and traffic flow you're likely to encounter. 'Active Lane Keeping', 'Traffic jam Assist', 'Lane Change Assist' and 'Night Vision Assist' features are also available.

Cost of Ownership

As suggested earlier, EV range has increased substantially - by around 35%. That's with the larger 'Performance Battery Plus' pack that most customers want, which has been increased in size from 93 to 105kWh (though is 9kg lighter) with the unit arranged in 396 pouch cells, which sit in a redesigned housing with composite glassfibre materials for its underbody guard. That bigger pack is optional with the base Taycan and mid-range Taycan S Sport Turismo models, which as standard come with an 89kWh pack (10kW bigger than before) that takes them, respectively, either 351 or 332 miles on a charge. With the larger 105kWh pack fitted, the base version goes up to 404 miles and the Taycan 4S up to 383 miles. The top Turbo versions only comes with the 105kWh pack. The Turbo goes up to 377 miles, while the Turbo S is rated at up to 375 miles. To preserve charge, there are weight improvements of up to 15kgs. And the maximum recuperation capacity during deceleration from high speeds has increased by more than 30 per cent from 290kW to up to 400kW. As before, unlike most of its rivals (but as with the similarly-engineered Audi e-tron GT), this Taycan has an 800volt electrical infrastructure (rather than the usual EV 400v set-up). This time round, this model's bigger battery packs can charge at up to 320kW (50kW more than before) and Porsche says that both packs will charge from 10-80% in just 18 minutes (4 minutes quicker than the equivalent smaller-capacity batteries could do before). It's 33 minutes hooked up to a more usual 150kW public DC supply. Home wallbox charging should be quicker too, thanks to a new controller and software for the 11kW AC in-built charger. With an 11kW supply, the 93kWh battery needs nine hours to charger from empty to full; it'd be 11 hours for the 105kWh battery.

Summary

So this is the future face of Porsche. EV technology, futuristic looks, fearsome performance and lots of VW Group influence. Died-in-the-wool 911 enthusiasts need not apply. But the enlightened lottery winners among them might find something to like with this Taycan Sport Turismo, particularly in this revised form. It gives you everything you'd want from a Taycan - and nothing you don't. It's not quite as much of an automotive Swiss army knife as the Taycan Cross Turismo. But a typical Sport Turismo customer won't need this car to be that. They'll simply want a practical, devastatingly quick and imposing expression of Porsche EV technology. You'll get that here.

This vehicle has been discontinued.

Advantages

Advantages
Variable Initial rentals (Zero possible)
Road Tax included for full duration
Breakdown Cover
Full Manufacturer warranty
Peace of mind motoring
No payment fluctuations
Delivered to your front door (free)
Taxable Benefits for Businesses
Possible VAT reclaims
No Depreciation to worry about
No Baloon payment

Considerations

Considerations
Do not own vehicle
Cannot modify vehicle
Possible end of contract costs
Possible Excess mileage Charge
Credit Check performed
Possible Early Termination fee
No Equity