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Affordable Ford Mustang Fastback Petrol leasing, All our Ford Mustang Fastback leasing offers include free mainland delivery and exceptional customer support.

  • Petrol
Special Offer
Ford Mustang - 5.0 V8 GT 2dr Auto
Special Offer
Ford Mustang - 5.0 V8 GT 2dr Auto
Special Offer
Ford Mustang - 5.0 V8 GT 2dr Auto
Special Offer
Ford Mustang - 5.0 V8 GT 2dr Auto
Special Offer
Ford Mustang - 5.0 V8 GT 2dr Auto
Special Offer
Ford Mustang - 5.0 V8 GT 2dr Auto
Special Offer
Ford Mustang - 5.0 V8 GT 2dr Auto
Special Offer
Ford Mustang - 5.0 V8 GT 2dr Auto
Special Offer
Ford Mustang - 5.0 V8 GT 2dr Auto

Images for illustration purposes only and may show options not included in the rental

Affordable Ford Mustang Fastback Petrol leasing, All our Ford Mustang Fastback leasing offers include free mainland delivery and exceptional customer support.

  • Petrol
Special Offer
Ford Mustang - 5.0 V8 GT 2dr Auto
Ford Mustang - 5.0 V8 GT 2dr Auto
Ford Mustang - 5.0 V8 GT 2dr Auto
Ford Mustang - 5.0 V8 GT 2dr Auto
Ford Mustang - 5.0 V8 GT 2dr Auto
Ford Mustang - 5.0 V8 GT 2dr Auto
Ford Mustang - 5.0 V8 GT 2dr Auto
Ford Mustang - 5.0 V8 GT 2dr Auto
Ford Mustang - 5.0 V8 GT 2dr Auto

Images for illustration purposes only and may show options not included in the rental

Ford Mustang - 5.0 V8 GT 2dr Auto
Ford Mustang - 5.0 V8 GT 2dr Auto
Ford Mustang - 5.0 V8 GT 2dr Auto
Ford Mustang - 5.0 V8 GT 2dr Auto
Ford Mustang - 5.0 V8 GT 2dr Auto
Ford Mustang - 5.0 V8 GT 2dr Auto
Ford Mustang - 5.0 V8 GT 2dr Auto
Ford Mustang - 5.0 V8 GT 2dr Auto
Ford Mustang - 5.0 V8 GT 2dr Auto

Vehicle Information

Manufacturer OTR

£54,900.00
Inc VAT

0-62 MPH

4.90 Seconds

Fuel Type

Petrol

Transmission

Automatic

CO2 Emission

127 G/KM

Engine Power

446 BHP

Central (UK) Vehicle Leasing Limited are NOT liable for any manufacturer changes in models or specifications. It is the customers responsibility to ensure that the vehicle(s) has the correct specification required.

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Vehicle Dimensions
Fuel Consumption - ICE
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All Prices Subject to change and any offer may be removed from sale without prior notice.
All images used are for illustration purposes only and may not reflect the exact car supplied or model shown.

Specifications: Central (UK) Vehicle Leasing Limited are NOT liable for any manufacturer changes in models or specifications. It is the customers responsibility to ensure that the
vehicle(s) has the correct specification required. Any information supplied on specification is only for
guidance purposes and obtained from a third party CAP Data and not the manufacturer. For accurate specification data please consult the manufacturer direct.

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Independent Review - By Car and Driving

Thanks to this update, Ford's Mustang will be with us a little longer. Jonathan Crouch takes a look.

Ten Second Review

This seventh generation Mustang isn't really designed for the future. Instead, it mainly references the past, carrying over its engine and platform from the previous model. Ford wants to give its best-selling sports car a final stay of execution before this model goes the way of all combustion things - hence the sharper exterior and more modern cabin. So it's still authentic and if you loved it before, you'll love it now.

Background

So here we are at the end of an era. This seventh generation Ford Mustang will almost certainly be the last in this iconic model line of hairy-chested muscle-bound US sports coupes and convertibles, which dates back to 1964. Not to be confused with the all-electric Mustang Mach-E electric hatch, which stands for everything most 'Stang owners would abjectly hate. "Investing in another generation of Mustang is a big statement at a time when many of our competitors are exiting the business of internal combustion vehicles" said Ford CEO Jim Farley at this MK7 model's Autumn 2022 launch. Except that this isn't really another generation of Mustang; more a far-reaching facelift of the previous coupe and convertible. The engines and suspension are basically the same as those of the previous Fastback and cabrio models, which were launched back in 2015, as is the 'S-550' platform. So just how different is this MK7 Mustang from what went before? Let's take a look.

Driving Experience

Ford says that this is the 'most authentic and confidence-inspiring Mustang to drive yet'. That seems a contradiction in terms because an 'authentic' slightly unwieldy heavy-set Mustang experience hasn't been in the past been one to deliver much confidence - at least not on damp tarmac. But there's promise here because all models have a torsen limited-slip differential and the contents of Ford's 'Performance Pack', which gives you magneride adaptive dampers; big Brembo six-piston front calipers and four-piston rear calipers; and sticky tyres, the rears being 20mm wider 275-section items. We haven't yet mentioned the engine and transmission options, basically because they haven't really changed. Ford claims the contrary, pointing out that the base 2.3-litre four-cylinder EcoBoost 290PS unit has been updated with a fresh bore and stroke design and a new turbo. It makes 62mph in 5.8s en route to 145mph. Ideally though, you'd choose the 5.0-litre 'Coyote' V8, which is as before with 450PS, though with the addition of a new dual cold air intake. Both engines usually work with a lightly updated version of the previous 10-speed torque converter automatic gearbox, but, thank goodness, the V8 can still be ordered 'authentically' with a manual, which cuts the 4.8s 0-62mph sprint time to 4.6s. As before, the auto has been configured to work with a selectable 'Drag Strip' driving mode which irons out the torque and power drop-off you'd normally get between gear shifts, so it's just one seamless burst of acceleration.

Design and Build

Ford describes the look of this MK7 Mustang as 'more edgy' and that's about right. As before, there are Fastback Coupe and soft-top Convertible versions offered, each providing a distinct design evolution. Slim LED headlights are hooded by an aggressive bonnet and there are dual air intakes in the front grille and dynamic 19-inch multi-spoke alloy wheels fitted out with the Brembo brakes that come as part of the 'Performance Pack' - standard-fit for our market. The rear is subtly different too, with an extended deck that features re-styled light clusters with the Mustang's unique 3-bar signature. It's inside though, that the changes you'll most notice prominently feature. Inevitably, this involves screen tech; a little disappointingly in a Mustang, analogue dials are no more, replaced by a 12.4-inch digital display (though you can configure it to show 'classic dials'). That's paired with a customisable 13.2-inch SYNC4 central infotainment monitor which of course can do a lot more than was possible with the previous generation screen and houses the optional 12-speaker B&O audio system upgrade that most customers will want. Arguably more significant than all of this is the improvement in cabin quality, though you still wouldn't mistake this for the interior of a premium German-branded rival. But maybe that's part of its appeal. Ford says the cockpit is more driver-focused and there's a thicker-rimmed flat-bottomed steering wheel and grippy sports seats. Everything else is as before. Cramped space in the back and (in the Coupe) a reasonable 408-litre boot. Ford reckons even the Convertible's 332-litre trunk will take a couple of golf bags.

Market and Model

Pricing shouldn't differ much from the previous generation model, which started at around £50,000, though that was for the 5.0-litre V8, which was the only engine that was being offered by the end of the old MK6 model's production run. Expect the same kind of premium as before to switch from Fastback Coupe to Convertible - around £3,500. And on the V8 model, as before, expect a £2,000 saving if you opt for the 6-speed manual gearbox rather than the 10-speed automatic. The Mustang now offers 12 colour options including three new shades - eye-catching Blue Ember, Vapor Blue and Yellow Splash. Customers can also choose from Black or Red Brembo brake calliper colour options, plus a choice of two new 19-inch alloy wheel designs. As for drive assistance technology, well there are the expected next-generation Ford driver assistance features, like Speed Sign Recognition, Intelligent Adaptive Cruise Control with Stop & Go functionality, Lane Centring Assist, Evasive Steer Assist and Reverse Brake Assist. Another key feature is Active Pothole Mitigation, which continually monitors suspension, body, steering and braking input and adjusts suspension response accordingly. 'Stolen Vehicle Services' - a 'FordPass' function providing 24-hour support in the event of theft - is also new to Mustang. Owners can stay connected with their Mustang via the FordPass app in other ways, utilising remote features such as remote vehicle start and stop, door locking and unlocking, scheduling a start time, locating the vehicle, and vehicle health and status checks. 

Cost of Ownership

Take a deep breath here because you're going to have to pay for your pleasures - at least if you go for the V8 version anyway. The combination of nearly 1.8-tonnes of kerb weight and a normally aspirated 5.0-litre engine couldn't really deliver any other kind of end result. The efficiency figures aren't much different from those quoted with the previous MK6 model, which saw the Fastback V8 manual coupe only manage 22.7mpg on the combined cycle and 277g/km of CO2 - inevitably, it's fractionally worse than that if you go for the Convertible. For the auto, the previous readings (which again we'd expect to be similar with this MK7 model) are slightly better - 23.3mpg and 270g/km in the Fastback and 22.5mpg and 279g/km in the Convertible. It doesn't have to be like this: Mercedes, for example, has proved that an equally powerful V8 can produce returns up to 50% better than that. Talking of 50% better returns, you can get these with a Mustang - but only if you opt for the alternative turbocharged 2.3-litre EcoBoost four cylinder engine option. This powerplant works with an 'Active Grille Shutter' that reduces aerodynamic drag at the front end. Again, the previous MK6 model figures should be pretty applicable here, which saw a 2.3-litre Mustang Fastback Coupe auto theoretically capable of 30.7mpg on the combined cycle and 205g/km of CO2. The old 2.3-litre Convertible auto managed 29.7mpg and 211g/km.

Summary

For 'Stang enthusiasts, there's both joy and sorrow here. Joy that against the current zeitgeist, Ford has seen fit to extend the life of its iconic sports car. And sorrow that this is almost certainly its final curtain call - in combustion form anyway. If Ford had been serious about continuing this model line with the kind of feel and blood line an enthusiast would recognise, it would have created a properly new design for it; the brand's latest 'CD6' architecture that underpins the current US-spec Ford Explorer was ready and waiting for just such a thing. But what brand could commit to that in a market turning to Hybrids and EVs? Yes, even in this Mustang's segment; one of its nearest rivals, the Mercedes-AMG C 63, is now a Plug-in Hybrid. Ford might well have ended Mustang Coupe and Convertible production completely, but didn't want to quite yet because the old post-2015-era sixth generation version sold so well, garnering that series Mustang the title of 'the world's best-selling sports car'. So it is that we've got the facelift which you may or may not think does enough to deserve it's claimed 'MK 7' status. But at least we have it. At least you can still buy a proper Mustang. And at least the 'Pony Car' story will have one last chapter.

Interested in vehicle maintenance?

£68.08 inc VAT per month

Deal Summary

Lease Type

Personal Contract Hire

Contract Length

48 months

Initial Rental

£8,783.86 inc VAT (+12 months)

Annual Mileage

5000 P/A

Admin Fee

£180.00 inc VAT

Maintenance

No

Options

Your Deal

Personal Lease inc VAT

Initial Rental inc VAT

£731.99

£8,783.86

Your Deal

£731.99 inc VAT

Initial Rental: £8,783.86 inc VAT

Advantages

Advantages
Variable Initial rentals (Zero possible)
Road Tax included for full duration
Breakdown Cover
Full Manufacturer warranty
Peace of mind motoring
No payment fluctuations
Delivered to your front door (free)
Taxable Benefits for Businesses
Possible VAT reclaims
No Depreciation to worry about
No Baloon payment

Considerations

Considerations
Do not own vehicle
Cannot modify vehicle
Possible end of contract costs
Possible Excess mileage Charge
Credit Check performed
Possible Early Termination fee
No Equity